Dilemma of Gonial Angle in Sex Determination. Sexually Dimorphic or Not?

The determination of sex from human remains has a crucial role in forensic anthropology. It has been known that the mandible has several useful traits for sex determination. The gonial angle, which is one of them, has been evaluated by forensic practitioners to identify sexual dimorphism with morphologic and metrical analyses. However, there are opposing approaches on the sexual dimorphism of the gonial angle in the literature, which contradict each other. There are also some other studies asserting that it cannot be employed in sex determination. The purpose of this study is first to figure out the reason for this dilemma and then establish the significance of the gonial angle in sex determination in a white sample.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31306169

Position Summary:

The Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Forensic Investigation. This is a full-time, nine-month basis position starting in August of 2020.

Responsibilities:

The successful candidate will have a demonstrated competency, or the capability, for teaching courses in Forensic Investigation. Courses should include some combination of the following: Biometrics/Fingerprinting, Criminalistics, Crime Scene Processing, Forensic Criminology, Criminal Investigation, Research Methods in Forensics, Counter-Terrorism, Medico-Legal Death Investigation, Clandestine Grave Investigation, Courtroom Testimony and Evidence, Evidence Collection and Management, Cyber Crime, and Fraud Investigation.

The typical teaching load is 4 courses per semester (4/4) plus student advising. Other duties may be assigned by the Department Chair. Applicants will also be expected to participate in scholarly activities, provide academic advising to students, and participate in department, college, university and public service. It is expected that the candidate remains professionally active in the Criminal Justice/Forensic Investigation community. Additional teaching or other responsibilities may be available, including during the summer, depending on department needs and the interest of the selected candidate. More

 

What You’ll Need to Succeed:

Minimum Qualifications

    • The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in Forensic Science, a related science, Criminal Justice, Engineering (Mechanical or Electrical), Anthropology (specializing in Physical Anthropology) or another closely related field. An ABD (all but dissertation), if hired, will be contractually obligated to complete the Ph.D. by September 1, 2021. The preferred candidate would be on track to achieve their Ph.D. by the start date.
    • Alternatively, an M.D. with medico-legal investigatory or laboratory experience will also be considered.
    • Applicants must have evidence of a strong commitment to undergraduate and graduate education in a liberal arts environment and a willingness to collaborate with both students and faculty.
    • Applicants must have demonstrable knowledge of the intersection of the domains of Law and Science.

Preferred Qualifications

  • 3 years of effective teaching experience at the college level teaching Forensic Investigation and/or Forensic Investigation related courses.
  • 3 years of professional, field, or administrative experience in a Forensic Investigation related arena.
  • Laboratory (Crime Laboratory or Medical Examiner’s Office) experience.

Two fossilized human crania (Apidima 1 and Apidima 2) from Apidima Cave, southern Greece, were discovered in the late 1970s but have remained enigmatic owing to their incomplete nature, taphonomic distortion and lack of archaeological context and chronology. Here we virtually reconstruct both crania, provide detailed comparative descriptions and analyses, and date them using U-series radiometric methods. Apidima 2 dates to more than 170 thousand years ago and has a Neanderthal-like morphological pattern. By contrast, Apidima 1 dates to more than 210 thousand years ago and presents a mixture of modern human and primitive features. These results suggest that two late Middle Pleistocene human groups were present at this site—an early Homo sapiens population, followed by a Neanderthal population. More

 

Forensic scientists are working with the British military to open the United Kingdom’s first body farm — a site where researchers will be able to study the decomposition of human remains.

Details are not yet finalized, but the plans are at an advanced stage: project leaders hope this year to open the farm, also known as a forensic cemetery or taphonomy facility, after the discipline devoted to the study of decay and fossilization.

Such sites — which have existed for decades in the United States and more recently in countries including the Netherlands and Australia — generate data on tissue and bone degradation under controlled conditions, along with chemical changes in the soil, air and water around a corpse, to help criminal and forensic investigators. Researchers argue that they provide information crucial to criminal investigations that can’t be obtained from equivalent animal studies, but critics say that they are gruesome and that their value to research is unproven. More

Two fossilized human crania (Apidima 1 and Apidima 2) from Apidima Cave, southern Greece, were discovered in the late 1970s but have remained enigmatic owing to their incomplete nature, taphonomic distortion and lack of archaeological context and chronology. Here we virtually reconstruct both crania, provide detailed comparative descriptions and analyses, and date them using U-series radiometric methods. Apidima 2 dates to more than 170 thousand years ago and has a Neanderthal-like morphological pattern. By contrast, Apidima 1 dates to more than 210 thousand years ago and presents a mixture of modern human and primitive features. These results suggest that two late Middle Pleistocene human groups were present at this site—an early Homo sapiens population, followed by a Neanderthal population. Our findings support multiple dispersals of early modern humans out of Africa, and highlight the complex demographic processes that characterized Pleistocene human evolution and modern human presence in southeast Europe. More

Neanderthal skull and its reconstruction

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